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Alphabetical Index of all judgments on this web site as at 20 January 2022

Index by Dioceses of 2021 judgments on this web site.

Reordering

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The petition sought approval for the removal of eleven pews from the back of the church (leaving five rows at the front) and their replacement with fifty metal, upholstered chairs and a number of tables with folding legs. The Victorian Society objected to the removal of the pews (or so many of them) and the replacement chairs. The Chancellor decided to permit the removal of only seven pew benches and the introduction of only 30 chairs and eight tables, the design of the chairs to be agreed with the Diocesan Advisory Committee and, in default of such agreement, by the Chancellor.

The petitioners proposed to remove the church's pipe organ (built in 1878), leaving the front of the casing and its decorative pipes, and to install an electronic organ within the old casing. The organ had not been regularly used for many years and was considered difficult to play. Also, the estimated cost of restoration of the organ was beyond the means of the Parochial Church Council. The space created by the removal of the organ would provide for a vestry and storage room. The British Institute of Organ Studies argued that the casing was an integral part of the organ and that the two should not be separated, though in fact the casing, which matched panels in the church, was a later addition in 1925. The Deputy Chancellor granted a faculty.

The church had fallen into a state of dereliction in the 1970s and had to be closed. In 2010 a trust was set up to improve the church and grow its congregation. By 2018 there was an average Sunday attendance of 150, but due to the state of the building and lack of heating, the congregation had to meet for worship in a marquee inside the church with portable heating. A major scheme of reordering was proposed, including heating and lighting, toilet and kitchen facilities and the creation of more floor space by the introduction of an upper floor at the west end. Of the amenity societies who were consulted, only the Georgian Group had objections to the proposals, principally concerning the proposed new upper floor space. The Chancellor granted a faculty, being satisfied that there was a compelling case for the improvements, which would support a now thriving congregation.

The proposal was to remove the worn Victorian tiles at the west end of the nave, apart from those around the font, and to replace them with Cadeby limestone paving to match the paving laid to replace the Victorian tiles in the remainder of the nave 20 years previously, when the Parochial Church Council was unable to replace all the tiles in the nave. Heritage England and the Victorian Society objected. The Chancellor was satisfied that any harm to the significance of the church as a building of special architectural or historic interest would not be serious, and he accordingly granted a faculty.

The proposal was to remove the worn Victorian tiles at the west end of the nave, apart from those around the font, and to replace them with Cadeby limestone paving to match the paving laid to replace the Victorian tiles in the remainder of the nave 20 years previously, when the Parochial Church Council was unable to replace all the tiles in the nave. Heritage England and the Victorian Society objected. The Chancellor was satisfied that any harm to the significance of the church as a building of special architectural or historic interest would not be serious, and he accordingly granted a faculty.

The proposals included an extension to provide an accessible WC and external door lobby and adaptations to the existing meeting area (formerly a vestry) to include a kitchen, separated off by glazed screens from the rest of the church.  A water supply and sewerage system were required. The Chancellor was satisfied that the proposals were desirable and appropriate for the church and granted a faculty.

Proposals for re-ordering of the unlisted Victorian church comprised three items, only one of which was contentious, namely, removal of the existing altar dais and raised flooring in the sanctuary, mounting the altar on castors, and laying a new level floor with a parquet surface throughout the chancel. The intention was to create a more flexible area in the chancel for worship and for musical performances. Faculty granted.

The hearing in this case was supplemental to a faculty application determined by a hearing in January 2015 (see Re St. James the Apostle Islington [2015]), when the Chancellor granted a faculty for works to (inter alia) the chancel of the church. The present application also contained matters relating to the chancel. Two objectors in this case raised objections to the lighting only. The Chancellor ruled that the objections related only to procedural irregularities and not to the merits of the proposals. He therefore granted a faculty for all the additional works.

The Chancellor granted a faculty, firstly, to give retrospective approval to the internal redecoration of the church already carried out and, secondly, to permit the disposal of miscellaneous artefacts from the church, including a bier, a 'spare' reredos, a number of redundant pews and a side altar. The Chancellor dealt with the matter by written representations, rather than by a hearing, as he considered that none of the items could be described as a 'church treasure'.

A quinquennial report in 1986 recorded a serious state of deterioration of the stonework of the church. The church raised £30,000 and spent it on repairs. However, the tower was in a serious condition and an estimate of £140,000 was given for repairs to the tower alone. The Parochial Church Council of the small parish was unable to find the money for the urgent repairs and sought to sell two silver flagons, valued at £25,000, to help them to deal with the emergency. The Chancellor decided that, in order to meet the emergency, the sale of the flagons should be allowed, and he therefore granted a faculty for the sale of the silver.