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The petitioner wished to erect on the grave of his late wife a red granite memorial with a polished face and gold lettering. The priest-in-charge declined to approve the memorial on the grounds that gold lettering was not permissible and that the size and colour of the memorial would not be in keeping with the other memorials in the churchyard. The Chancellor determined that it would be unreasonable to refuse a faculty for the memorial, as the use of gold lettering was widespread in the churchyard; also, there was a large number of polished granite stones which, though mostly black, did include a number of red granite stones, including  a red granite stone on the grave next to the grave of the petitioner's wife.

The petition proposed the removal and disposal by sale of the existing 25 pews and their replacement with 125 Howe 40/4 chairs. The Deputy Chancellor granted a faculty.

The proposal was to introduce a ramp and steps just inside the north door, which is the main entrance to the Grade I church in regular use. English Heritage opposed the proposal. However, the Chancellor decided to grant a faculty subject to an amendment to the design suggested by English Heritage.

The works proposed by the petitioners included the removal of pews from the north and south aisles and the augmentation of toilet and kitchen facilities within the church. The Victorian Society objected to the removal of pews. Re St. Alkmund Duffield [2013] considered. Faculty granted.

There had originally been a proposal to sell the organ located in the church tower, and to use the space presently occupied by the organ to provide for kitchen and toilet facilities. The organ had not been used for many years, but had been installed shortly after the church had been built in the 19th century. However, the current petition was limited to the sale and removal of the organ. The Chancellor was satisfied in principal that the removal of the organ and installation of the kitchen and toilet facilities would benefit the church and the community, and he granted a faculty for the sale of the organ, provided that the sale would take place within two years, and provided also that the organ should remain as it is until the petitioners have permission from the Court to install the proposed kitchen and toilet facilities.

The Chancellor refused to grant a confirmatory faculty for a memorial introduced into the churchyard without authority, the memorial being in contravention of the Churchyard Rules

There were five applications to exhume human remains. The graves had been undermined by the collapse of a badger sett following heavy rains. The Chancellor granted faculties for the remains to be exhumed and reinterred in a part of the churchyard away from the badger sett.

In April 2020, the Chancellor had granted an interim injunction (subsequently renewed) on the application of the Parish Council, who were responsible for maintenance of the churchyard. The injunction was against further lopping or removal of trees, or erecting a replacement boundary between the churchyard and the adjoining inn by the owner of the inn. The Chancellor asked the Archdeacon to meet the parties and agree the boundary line between the churchyard and the inn. Agreement was in fact reached. The Chancellor gave the Parochial Church Council (PCC) time to make representations regarding the boundary, after which the Chancellor would make a final order, which would include a declaration regarding the agreed boundary line and a prohibition against the owner of the inn doing any further lopping or felling or erecting a boundary fence or other demarcation. If the PCC wished to erect a fence in due course, they would need to apply for a faculty.

The petitioners applied for an amendment to a Faculty regarding the introduction of upholstered metal chairs to replace 7 pews that were removed under Faculty.  The Chancellor was persuaded that the chairs petitioned for would be appropriate in the particular circumstances of this case.

The petitioners sought a faculty to allow a temporary reordering, authorised by the Archdeacon, to remain permanently. This included a children's area at the west end of the church, the removal of a large painting from the west wall, the permanent removal of six pews, and an information 'Hub'. There were four objectors, of whom one became a party opponent. The Chancellor concluded that the impact of the proposed changes on the appearance of the church would be modest, and that the proposals for providing information about the church to a growing population were appropriate. He accordingly granted a faculty.